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I readily admit, my upbringing was pretty much like everyone else; at least in the sense that I was taught Mortalism, which is “the belief that human beings are not naturally immortal…” Therefore, any suggestion that Immortality is a possibility is often dismissed by the population at large; yet, stories of Immortals abound. Is it just a hope of living forever that drives these stories, or could there possibly be some, even a little, truth to Immortality.

My research has found a clear and distinct link between moral behavior and the achievement of Immortality. To start, let’s take a look at the words of Eliphas Levi:

“When the masters in alchemy say that little time and money are needed to accomplish the works of science, above all when they affirm that one vessel is alone needed, when they speak of the great and unique Athanor which all can use, which is ready to each man’s hand, which all possess without knowing it, they allude to philosophical and moral alchemy” (Eliphas Levi, The Doctrine of Transcendental Magic, 1854, p. 59). 

Of course, an Athanor is a unique oven; it even goes by the names, Philosophical furnace, Furnace of Arcana, or the Tower furnace. This is a reference to the Philosophers Stone and the Great Arcana, which is the quest for Immortality. The metaphor of cooking or heating something has several uses; but for the sake of this conversation, let’s just discuss the cooking or making of a moral man. Morality can best be defined as:

a body of standards or principles derived from a code of conduct from a particular philosophy, religion, or culture, or it can derive from a standard that a person believes should be universal. Morality may also be specifically synonymous with “goodness” or “rightness”… Immorality is the active opposition to morality (i.e. opposition to that which is good or right), while amorality is variously defined as an unawareness of, indifference toward, or disbelief in any set of moral standards or principles.

The first and perhaps biggest lesson to learn, if one wants to attain an Immortal state, is that He must be a Man with a high moral character. Let us again take a closer look at Levi’s quote from above, but before you reread it again, please take a closer look from this perspective, and ask yourself these questions, what is meant by “little time and money” is needed, or perhaps, what is the “one vessel,” or again, what is within reach of each “man’s hand,” and what does “each person possess,” and of course, the indirect reference to the Philosophers Stone and the Great Arcana, which is a reference to Immortality. Here it is again:

“When the masters in alchemy say that little time and money are needed to accomplish the works of science, above all when they affirm that one vessel is alone needed, when they speak of the great and unique Athanor which all can use, which is ready to each man’s hand, which all possess without knowing it, they allude to philosophical and moral alchemy” (Eliphas Levi, The Doctrine of Transcendental Magic, 1854, p. 59).

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In other words, you too possess the gift of Immortality. Therefore, the study and mastery of moral behavior is essential to the attainment of Immortality, which brings us to the study of Albert Pike and his book Morals and Dogma (1872). So many people, even Freemasons, don’t truly understand his book or the principle reason for his writing of it; they simply dismiss it as either too difficult to read, or utter nonsense. Nevertheless, if one really takes the time to understand his writings, and not just dismiss it based on other peoples limited knowledge of it, they too would find countless wonders.

I have heard and read this saying, time and time again, “A god in the making,” or variants thereof. In short, that means once you have attained your Immortal status, you have become a god. No, this is not blasphemy. In all actuality, we were made in God’s image; and since God is Immortal, we can become an Immortal as well. Nevertheless, in order to gain that stature, one must also attain traits like God; this is where the moral lessons come in. Albert Pike was clear when he wrote about our current moral state:

Remember that every moral characteristic of man finds its prototype among creatures of lower intelligence that the cruel foulness of the hyena, the savage rapacity of the wolf, the merciless rage of the tiger, the crafty treachery of the panther, are found among mankind, and ought to excite no other emotion, when found in the man, than when found in the beast. Why should the true man be angry with the geese that hiss, the peacocks that strut, the asses that bray, and the apes that imitate and chatter, although they wear the human form (Albert Pike, Morals and Dogma, 1872, p. 76)?

Simply stated, we humans no longer seek godlike stature, which coincides with the current disbelief in Immortality. Nevertheless, Eliphas Levi, Pike’s principle teacher and the man that most influenced his writings, wrote that through the use of temperance, which can be defined as, “moderation or self-restraint in action, statement, etc.; self-control,” we may in fact gain Immortality:

Temperance, tranquillity of soul, simplicity of character, calmness and rationality of will, these things not only make us happy but strong and well. By growth in reason and goodness man becomes immortal. We are the authors of our own destiny, and God does not save us apart from our own concurrence. There is no death for the sage; death is a phantom, made horrible by the weakness and ignorance of the vulgar(Eliphas Levi, Doctrine of Transcendental Magic, 1854, p. 96).

Did you get that? Through goodness, temperance and reason, man can gain Immortality. Death is, in fact, a phantom, which is only made possible by one’s ignorance and weakness. To go a little deeper, Levi also stated that the majority of our physical ills are due to our mortal sins. This leads to physical death:

“THE MAJORITY of our physical complaints come from our moral diseases, according to the one and universal dogma, and by reason of the law of analogies. A great passion to which we abandon ourselves corresponds always to a great malady in store. Mortal sins are so named because they cause death physically and positively(Eliphas Levi, Doctrine of Transcendental Magic, 1854, p. 96).

Sadly, we live in a world of illusions, or as Levi firmly stated, “How pitiable are men in their ignorance, but how they would despise themselves if only they came to know!” Came to know what? Simply stated, the truth that we do in fact have options, if we only sought them.

So Mote It Be!

Hank Kraychir

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